About

Imagine yourself exploring the galaxy, building the next quantum computer, dissecting how cells crawl, or shining light on how atoms and the world itself comes together.

These exciting experiences can be found within the world of physics. Physics is concerned with the most basic principles that underlie all phenomena in the universe from sub-atomic particles to whole universes and everything in between. In Physics, you will learn about these exciting phenomena along with important skills in logic, problem solving, quantitative reasoning, and experimental design that employers in all fields are seeking.

Our graduates from both our PhD and bachelor’s programs go on to work in academia, national labs, engineering industries, data science, in Silicon Valley and on Wall Street.

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Program Requirements

Bachelor's degree requirements:
Bachelor's degree in physics is recommended but not required.

Minimum undergraduate GPA: 3.0
GRE Requirements: Not Required
Physics GRE Requirements: Not Required
TOEFL Requirements: Required

Description of your department culture

The graduate school experience at Syracuse University is well-rounded, where our students’ exploration of physics is not limited to a classroom or laboratory. Students can engage in academic discussions within organizations such as the Women in Physics group, the Physics Graduate student organization, and the physics-led graduate student group on Science and Public Policy. We host weekly departmental colloquia presented by scientists and faculty from around the country. In addition, interdisciplinary programs such as the Syracuse Soft Matter Program and the Syracuse Biomaterials Institute are available for interested students to enhance and diversify studies.

On the social side, the department annually hosts a welcoming breakfast, department picnic, and holiday party for all students, faculty, and staff. Refreshments are always available before every seminar and colloquium. For those who are interested in astronomy, there is an observatory on campus where physics grad students frequently hold stargazing events. For those who like sports, we even have a department softball team: the “Bad News Bohrs.” And a newly appointed Graduate Development Director is working to enhance career awareness beyond academia and build a sense of community among the graduate students by adding new group activities such as movie nights, student talent nights, and planning a student camping trip.